About


Rachel Michelle Gunter is a professor of History at a community college in North Texas. She earned a Ph.D. in U.S. history from Texas A&M University in 2017. She studies the woman suffrage movement in Texas from 1917 to 1923 focusing on how the successes and failures of the movement affected the voting rights of other groups including resident non-citizens/Mexican and German immigrants, servicemen, WWI veterans, Mexican Americans, and Black Texans. As part of this research she also looks into changes to the voting system including the beginning of absentee balloting in much of the United States and the run-off primary in Texas.


Publications


“They Think I Have Forgotten All About the Past”: Suffragists’ Struggle for Acceptance in Politics in Arizona and Texas


Rachel Michelle Gunter


Journal of Arizona History, vol. 61(2), https://muse.jhu.edu/article/757935, 2020, pp. 231-240


“‘Without Us, It is Ferguson with a Plurality,’ Woman Suffrage and Anti-Ferguson Politics.”


Rachel Michelle Gunter


Jessica Brannon-Wranosky, Impeached: The Removal of Texas Governor James E. Ferguson, A Centennial Examination, Texas A&M University Press, 2017


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Projects




Editor, Writer, Co-Writer, Consultant & On-camera Interviewee for “Citizens at Last,”


Dr. Gunter is currently contributing to a documentary on woman suffrage in Texas produced by the Ruthe Winegarten Foundation for Texas Women’s History.




Executive Advisory Committee Member for the Handbook of Texas Women


Dr. Gunter serves on the Executive Advisory Board of the Handbook of Texas History, a project of the Texas State Historical Association.




Texas Coordinator for the Online Biographical Dictionary of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the United States


Dr. Gunter is the Texas Coordinator for the Online Biographical Dictionary of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the United States, a crowd sourcing digital humanities project thru the Women and Social Movements in the United States website.


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Other pages



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